BUTTERFLIES OF NIGERIA

Presentation

Nigeria has an exceptional biodiversity, among this, butterfly species. Butterflies have an essential role for the good health of ecosystems, in particular forests threatened by deforestation, climate change, etc. Indeed, butterflies pollinate plants allowing their reproduction. The development of knowledge on these species is therefore essential to set up conservation and awareness-raising actions to protect forests in Nigeria, particularly in the Cross River National Park and the Omo Forest Reserve.

Project impact

The project will have an impact 1) on developing scientific knowledge of butterfly species and their preferred plants in protected forests, more particularly in the Cross River National Park and the Omo Forest Reserve, 2) to propose actions for conservation of these species and their habitats in the forests of Nigeria, and raising public awareness of their protection, 3) to involve different actors from the territory of Nigeria and Africa.

Project origin

Following the Exploratory Ecology’s publications of butterfly species photos on a facebook group, Mr. Ekpah Ojonugwa entomologist at the Nigerian Conservation Foundation contacted this French association for biodiversity protection on November 18, 2019. The meeting between these butterfly enthusiasts led to the following observation. Nigeria contains exceptional biodiversity in forests including butterfly species. But we currently lack the knowledge to protect these species. These exchanges therefore led to the development of a Franco-African collaboration on a study project on butterflies and forests in Nigeria.

Team project

Main team is made up of :

1) Ekpah Ojonugwa, graduate of a scientific master’s degree in applied entomology from the University of Lagos, works for Nigerian Conservation Foundation, which will carry out the field work, identification of species ;

2) Fanny Mallard, president of the Exploratory Ecology association, a lepidopterist with PhD in ecology, who will provide scientific support for production and communication;

3) Sven Aël Guen, after studying DUT Biological Engineering with Environmental Engineering option, graduate in Computer Science, administrator and networks, technical manager of the Exploratory Ecology association, who will bring his technical expertise for the IT part.

The team is reinforced by people from partner organizations in Africa who are technical, scientific and awareness-raising skills :

Scientific researchers validate the protocol like the researcher Oskar Brattström of the University of Cambridge, and determination of species like the researcher Steve Collins, of the research institute of the African butterflies.

Objectives

This project called ExplorCollect in Nigeria participating in protection of forests in Nigeria is divided into 3 objectives:

  • Objective 1 : Species inventory

The objective of this research is to increase knowledge on inventory of lepidopteran species in Nigeria. The species inventory will make it possible to identify and perhaps discover new species.

  • Objective 2 : Species monitoring

The butterflies monitoring will compare diversity between two forests with different microclimates, establish a reference of populations in these sites and monitor the impact of climate change over the long term.

  • Objective 3 : Conservation action

The nectariferous plants favored by butterflies will be identified. This knowledge would help organizations whose objective is the conservation of species and raising public awareness of the protection of these species.

Species inventory of Cross river national park

From January 21 to 25, 2020, first butterfly inventory was conducted in Cross River National Park in Nigeria.

Ce parc national est la plus grande zone de forêt tropicale au Nigéria. Cette zone d’étude a été sélectionnée car il s’agit d’un haut lieu de biodiversité de renommée internationale. Selon WWF, l’écorégion qui chevauche la frontière Cameroun-Nigéria est particulièrement riche en espèces de papillons forestiers en raison du microclimat favorable qui y règne. Pour ce premier inventaire des espèces , 4 points ont été échantillonnés (cf. figure ci-dessous).

This national park is the largest area of tropical forest in Nigeria. This study area was selected because it is an internationally renowned biodiversity hotspot. According to WWF, the ecoregion which straddles Cameroon-Nigeria border is particularly rich in species of forest butterflies due to the favorable microclimate. For this first inventory of species, 4 points were sampled (see figure below).

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Sampling areas in Cross River national park © Ekpah Ojonugwa

Butterflies were captured daily using a butterfly net. The collected species were carefully placed in a triangular envelope. Identification was made at the end of each day using the book of West African butterflies “Larsen, T.B. (2005a). Butterflies of West Africa. Apollo Books, Svendborg, Denmark. 595 pp + 135 color plates”. A total of 35 butterfly specimens were collected, including 29 species of butterflies and 1 species of moth. The species collected are listed below.

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Entomologist Ekpah Ojonugwa in Cross River National Park

The species observed are the following: Acraea peneleos , Acraea polis, Alytarchia amanda, Amauris niavius, Belenois theora , Bicyclus dorothea, Catuna crithea, Charaxes etheocles , Cymothoe beckeri , Danaus chrysippus falcippus , Elymniopsis bammakoo , Euphaedra fucora , Euptera elabontas , Eurema hecabe , Euriphene tadema , Graphium policenes , Hypolimnas anthedon, Hypolimnas misippus, Junonia oenone, Junonia sophia, Junonia terea, Lolaus sp., Melanitis leda, Mylothris chloris , Mylothris schumanni , Palla decius , Phalanta eurytis , Precis octavia , Precis pelarga , Sevenia occidentallium.

Danaus chrysippus is common (Larsen, 2005) widely distributed in Africa and can be observed in the south of France

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Danaus chrysippus falcippus © Ekpah Ojonugwa

The main habitat of Junonia terea consists of undisturbed forest environments. It is therefore a good indicator of disturbance of forest species (Larsen, 2005).

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Junonia terea © Ekpah Ojonugwa

Precis octavia is a common species in Nigeria. In the Calabar region, the forms of dry season do not begin to appear until December (Larsen, 2005).

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Precis octavia © Ekpah Ojonugwa

Precis pelarga is a fairly common butterfly from the forests and dense savannah of Guinea which has also adapted well to disturbed habitats (Larsen, 2005). The host plant in Côte d’Ivoire is Solenostemon rotundifolius (Vuattoux and Blandin 1979 In: Larsen, 2005).

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Precis pelarga © Ekpah Ojonugwa

Amauris niavius is a species that absorbs alkaloids from various plants, making it toxic to predators (Sáfián and Warren, 2015).

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Amauris niavius© Ekpah Ojonugwa

Bicyclus dorothea is included in the IUCN Red List. Both females and males are attracted to fermenting fruits. The caterpillars feed on various Poaceae (Sáfián and Warren, 2015).

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Bicyclus dorothea © Ekpah Ojonugwa

Species inventory of the Omo forest reserve

In February 2020, an inventory using the same methodology as the previous inventory was carried out in the Omo forest reserve.

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Sampling site (Erin camp) © Ekpah Ojonugwa

The species observed are the following: Appias sabina , Aterica galene, Bebearia flaminia, Bebearia innocua, Bebearia omo, Bebearia sophus, Bebearia zonaria, Cymothoe coccinata, Cymothoe egesta , Cymothoe sangaris, Euphaedra ruspina, Eupheadra ceres, Eupheadra hebes, Eupheadra medon, Eupheadra themis, Eurema floricola, Euryphura chalcis, Graphium policenes, Junonia terea, Lampides boeticus, Leptotes pirithous, Mylothris rhodope, Nepheronia pharis, Nepheronia thalassina, Neptis alta, Neptis paula, Papilio cynorta, Papilio cyproeofila, Protogoniomorpha parhassus, Thermoniphas micylus.

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Bebearia sophus © Ekpah Ojonugwa
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Euphaedra ruspina © Ekpah Ojonugwa
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Cymothoe egesta female © Ekpah Ojonugwa
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Cymothoe egesta male © Ekpah Ojonugwa
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Cymothoe coccinata © Ekpah Ojonugwa
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Eupheadra medon © Ekpah Ojonugwa
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Bebearia sophus © Ekpah Ojonugwa
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Bebearia zonaria © Ekpah Ojonugwa
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Cymothoe egesta © Ekpah Ojonugwa
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Leptotes pirithous © Ekpah Ojonugwa